organize thyself

I always think that creativity flourishes amid randomness. This might sound like an excuse to my cluttered desk, but honestly speaking, I like it that way - heavily random desk. The only thing I do is try to keep it neat with a positon for each item on the desk. For example, at any given time, my desk contains some wires, a remote control, some books, a writing pad, computer peripherals that are constantly needed which I keep connected to the machine and hence all their wires, a mug, pens, water bottle, photo frame, lamp, clock, and last but not the least the machine itself. Even like this, I've never had the need to remove any item due to space-shortage or over-crowdedness. The trick? It's simple - provide a proper place for every item. Here's how.
  • If you have wires, a lot of them, then try to separate each one. Now, every wire has two ends - one that goes in the machine and the other that goes to the wall. Jack the two ends properly and tie up the middle with a clip/rubber band/etc. I use wires clippers. Do the same with all other wires. Collect the middle portion of each wire you've just arranged, and make it a huge bundle. Now, find a wooden box that exactly fits this bundle and put the bundle inside this box, and put this box on top of your table.
  • Next up, you can use the space on top of this box for keeping your picture frame, remote control, or the mug.
  • I keep books stacked in a row to provide for easy use and storage.
  • I usually sqeeze objects into as smaller space as possible, but never stack objects on top of another unless the object on the bottom is never used (such as the box containing the bundle of wires).
  • Uh, and for all objects, don't forget to make the edges parallel
This page has an interesting read about how to organize our desk. It sounds more realistic, but I like to stick to my own style for the time being, which I find more convenient.

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